Personal Work

Photographer Spotlight: The Work of Rob Gregory

Rob Gregory is an internationally-recognized commercial photographer, specializing in sports, portrait and composite photography. His work has been featured in Time Magazine, Graphis, Digital Photographer and other prestigious publications. It’s also been featured in exhibits across the globe, including in Paris, London and Atlanta.

With a background that extends well beyond photography and includes work as an agency art director, Rob has worked with some of the biggest brands in the business, including The United States Marine Corps, Intel, Tide, Swiffer, and Capital One.

On a more personal not, Rob is also a cancer survivor. He enjoys donating as much time as he can to cancer and disability related causes. You can feel the care and respect he has for these causes simply by scrolling through his portfolio.

Based out of Chicago, Rob can often be found on location shooting all over the country. To see more of his work, check out Rob’s AtEdge portfolio or visit his website.

 

Richard Schultz’s Personal Project Puts A Spotlight on Tobacco Farming

In his recent project, Richard Schultz traveled to Kentucky to document tobacco harvesting.

Richard describes his experience shooting at the tobacco farm:

“I feel fortunate to be brought face-to-face, yet again, with Mexican migrant laborers who come to work in our country and do the hard work very few “Americans” would be willing to do. These images weren’t shot to be about Mexican immigration, they were meant to be about the harvest and labor in our country. It was just interesting to see that the farmers aren’t able to find any U.S. citizens who are willing to work that hard.”

Take a look at more of the images here, and check out Richard’s AtEdge portfolio and website for more of his lifestyle work.

©Richard Schultz

©Richard Schultz

©Richard Schultz

 

 

Lennette Newell’s Ani-Human Project

Wild is an adjective we often use to describe animals, reflecting the distance separating our civilized lifestyles from the outlying natural world.

In Lennette Newell‘s Ani-Human series, the gap between humans and wild animals is diminished, along with any hierarchy that has been imposed by the technology of man. The series portrays the certainty that a tranquil co-inhabitance can exist, and therefore the possibility that it could propagate.

Each subject, whether animal or human, is equal. Although the human subject could even be seen as subservient, trying to mimic the grace and physical beauty of the animal, yet imperfectly. An observation that is emphasized by the animals’ effortless elegance placed in both a man-made studio and an environmental backdrop. Together without a spatial barrier, an original relationship unfolds between the animal and the human, a peaceful coexistence that is not exploited by the somatic dominance of the animal, who could in a time period of seconds curtail the human’s life.

Snapshots of these interactions convey a joint persistence, though it is safe to say these interactions do not persist in space and time.

Lennette is represented by Elizabeth Poje. See more work from Lennette through her AtEdge portfolio and at elizabethpoje.com.

©Lennette Newell

©Lennette Newell

©Lennette Newell

©Lennette Newell

©Lennette Newell

©Lennette Newell

©Lennette Newell

©Lennette Newell

PX3 Prix de la Photographie Paris Honors Markku Lahdesmaki’s Recent Projects

Markku Lahdesmaki was selected in the 2016 Px3 Awards for two of his recent personal series that were shot last year.

The first project, YuccaLand, features images of the beautiful Coachella Valley as it’s longstanding stories in art and song show a colorful community set against the serene backdrop of the Valley.

The second project featured a series of biker portraits that were shot in central Chile during a campaign for Mountain Dew.

Markku is represented by Brite Productions. Take a look at more of Markku’s work through his AtEdge portfolio and at markkuphoto.com.

©Markku Lahdesmaki

©Markku Lahdesmaki

©Markku Lahdesmaki

©Markku Lahdesmaki

©Markku Lahdesmaki

©Markku Lahdesmaki

©Markku Lahdesmaki

©Markku Lahdesmaki

©Markku Lahdesmaki

©Markku Lahdesmaki

Matt Sartain- Elements

Matt Sartain teamed up with Jesse Silver, a prop stylist/set designer, for his recent project Elements.

Matt is represented by Tidepool Reps. Check out more of Matt’s work through his AtEdge portfolio and at mattsartain.com.

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

A Conversation with Chris Gordaneer

Chris Gordaneer is Canadian advertising photographer and director renowned for creating mesmerizing images that teleport viewers to other worlds.

Last year, Chris became a partner of Toronto’s Westside Studio. Founded in 1985, Westside Studio represents award-winning commercial photographers, including Chris, under the roof of Canada’s largest commercial photography building. In the United States, Chris is represented by Randy Cole Represents, a New York-based boutique agency promoting commercial photographers, directors and CGI artists.

Chris’ signature style – surreal with a soft color palette – has earned him more than 250 awards in the past 18 years and has gained the attention of a wide range of clients, many of whom ultimately commission Chris due to his love for the giant vista and the way he’s incorporated it into his personal work.

The energetic images Chris produces are the result of the intimacy he creates on set. “I always try to make people feel invited and welcome when I’m shooting,” Chris says. Combining his talent and vision with top-notch production, he always attempts to get the most out of every shoot.

We caught up with Chris recently to chat briefly about his background, the evolution of his style, and the relationship that’s developed between his personal and commercial work.

Chris Gordaneer - Composite Image

Composite image; background photographed in Scotland and model shot in studio

You recently became a partner at Westside Studio (Congrats!) Tell us about some of the salient points in your life and career leading up to that moment, and what this new role has meant for you.

Westside gave me a place to grow and challenge myself as a photographer, but even more valuable was that it helped foster the relationships I have in the industry. I went and did my work placement at Westside as an assistant and never left. I could see the opportunity to work with so many talented and creative people was right there in front of me, and I knew it was for me.

Chris Gordaneer for the 2015 Pan American Games

Olympic bronze medal winner and Canadian flag bearer Mark Oldershaw photographed for the 2015 Pan American Games held in Toronto

Describe your style and how it’s evolved into what it is today.

There’s definitely been a transition from analogue to digital, but I still like to try and capture as much as possible in camera. I like to create a certain mood with my photographs, not just a straight capture. I like my images to tell stories, to have a heroic feel that is direct and clear. Clear visuals are very important.

Chris Gordnaer - Composite Image 2

Composite image; background photographed in Alberta and model shot in studio

Tell us about your personal work. What has been the primary focus and why is it important to you?

I enjoy the outdoors and I think that comes across in my work with big skies and epic landscapes. Getting into remote areas is where I enjoy my location work the most. It’s important to me as a personal reset to spend some time being in nature. There are no distractions and it helps me focus on what’s around me and capturing the details I deem important.

Chris Gordaneer - Golden Ears Park in BC

Personal work, photographed at Golden Ears Park in British Columbia

How does your personal work relate to your commercial work? Have you noticed that clients commission you based off personal projects?

I try to travel to a remote area each year on my own to shoot a creative and explore. My personal images are often what I think attracts clients to me. They want that majestic and epic feel for their ads, which is great and makes most projects feel like they are tailor made for the marriage of my personal and commercial work.

Chris Gordaneer - Subaru

Image for Subaru Campaign, photographed on Vancouver Island

Where do you see photography going in the next few years and what kinds of things are you doing to stay current?

Most photographers now are expected to have a mix of photography and motion skills. The technology has changed at such an exponential rate that it seems like a natural progression to become a director. Understanding how to make powerful single images is very helpful and maybe even an advantage when creating motion work. I’ve really enjoyed the evolution.

Personal Work: Making Mushroom Ravioli

When food stylist Karen Tully and I collaborate on set, it’s usually a commercial shoot with tight direction from both AD and client.
This time we wanted to do a personal project with more creative freedom. I needed a finished pasta dish for my book, and so we figured a mushroom ravioli would give us plenty to work with in a day.
In addition to showing the finished dish, we also documented the prep and cooking.  This gave us some process shots of the pasta making, as well as some behind the scene studio images that we plan to use for the coming website revision.
Photographer: Jim Scherer
Food Stylist: Karen Tully
Digital Technician: Mark Nolan-Schou
Stylist Assistant: Kendra Smith