Personal Project

Mauricio Candela Takes It to the Street for His Recent Personal Project

Mauricio Candela highlights his passion for street photography in his recent personal project, “Urban Sports”.

The images feature candid moments of real people on the streets, playing sports and living in the moment.

For more work from Mauricio, visit his AtEdge portfolio and his website.

©Mauricio Candela

©Mauricio Candela

©Mauricio Candela

©Mauricio Candela

©Mauricio Candela

©Mauricio Candela

©Mauricio Candela

©Mauricio Candela

©Mauricio Candela

©Mauricio Candela

©Mauricio Candela

Harold Lee Miller in Creative Quarterly 47

Harold Lee Miller‘s series “Steam Plant” was selected as one of the winners in the professional photography category and will be featured in the upcoming Creative Quarterly 47.

See more of Harold’s work through his AtEdge portfolio and at haroldleemiller.com.

©Harold Lee Miller

©Harold Lee Miller

©Harold Lee Miller

©Harold Lee Miller

 

 

PX3 Prix de la Photographie Paris Honors Markku Lahdesmaki’s Recent Projects

Markku Lahdesmaki was selected in the 2016 Px3 Awards for two of his recent personal series that were shot last year.

The first project, YuccaLand, features images of the beautiful Coachella Valley as it’s longstanding stories in art and song show a colorful community set against the serene backdrop of the Valley.

The second project featured a series of biker portraits that were shot in central Chile during a campaign for Mountain Dew.

Markku is represented by Brite Productions. Take a look at more of Markku’s work through his AtEdge portfolio and at markkuphoto.com.

©Markku Lahdesmaki

©Markku Lahdesmaki

©Markku Lahdesmaki

©Markku Lahdesmaki

©Markku Lahdesmaki

©Markku Lahdesmaki

©Markku Lahdesmaki

©Markku Lahdesmaki

©Markku Lahdesmaki

©Markku Lahdesmaki

Braden Summers’ Personal Project Aims to Show Equality in Love

Braden Summers has been working on an on-going personal project titled “All Love is Equal” that aims to alter or change public perceptions of LGBTQ relationships.

Braden takes a “fairy tale” approach in his images that are predominate in heteronormative images. His goal in doing so is to show the world that the happily ever after dialogue can also exist in LGBTQ relationships.

In an article on Design Indaba, Braden explains his motives:

“By excluding these types of images of beauty for the LGBTQ community we are being told that we are not as beautiful, our romance doesn’t deserve this type of iconic treatment in the media and I thought that it was time for that to change.”

Check back here for more images in the series.

About Braden

Braden is a photographer, whose work alerts the viewer to the beauty in people & their environment. The undertones of his work are appreciative of diversity and acceptance, & ideas that are fundamentally supportive of a more positive lifestyle. His work has been featured in Marie Claire UK and on sites such as French Elle, French Glamour & The Huffington Post.

Braden is represented by Ramona Reps. To see more of his work, visit his AtEdge portfolio & his website, bradensummers.com.

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©Braden Summers

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©Braden Summers

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©Braden Summers

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©Braden Summers

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©Braden Summers

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©Braden Summers

Roberto Chamorro’s Recent Project Explores a World Without Art Education

Originally from Spain and raised in Miami Florida, Roberto Chamorro moved to New York City in 2001 where he began working as an assistant to Annie Leibowitz. After a short period of time, he launched his own career as a commercial photographer and has since traveled all over the world shooting campaigns for clients like Mercedes-Benz, Warner Bros Records, Univision, and LG.

Roberto’s most recent personal project, “Without Art Education,” draws from his positive experiences working in the art world and aims to bring attention to the importance of art education in the development of school-aged children.

We sat down with him to chat about the execution of the project and where he hopes to take it in the future.

To view more of Roberto’s work, visit his AtEdge portfolio and his website, robertochamorro.com

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©Roberto Chamorro

What personally motivated you to begin this project? Have you ever done anything like this before?

It began at a dinner party with a few friends. We started discussing the ongoing issue of public schools cutting art and music education due to lack of funding. Sadly, those programs are usually the first to go. We were all creative people with young kids in the school system, so it struck a nerve with us.  Just the thought of kids being denied the opportunity to be introduced and educated in the arts had me fuming. Creativity is something I’ve spent my whole life pursuing.  I have always felt lucky to have been exposed to the arts at an early stage in my life.  After that party, I spent the next few days trying to figure out how to shine a light on this topic.

Being a photographer who specializes in advertising, and with a subspecialty in shooting kids, it seemed natural to do something campaign driven. It was just a matter of hashing out a concept.

I started thinking about how different I would be if I had gone to a school that cut these programs.

This thought eventually sparked the concept of imagining who else would be different today if they had never been introduced to art and music. To be relevant and to engage with a bigger audience, I decided to portray current, well-known artists as school children. The idea being that without an early introduction to the arts, these well-known artists might not be the creative and accomplished individuals they are today. They might not have ever given the world the beautiful gifts they have bestowed upon us already. If Pharrell for example, did not follow the path he did in music, then the world might be a little less HAPPY.

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©Roberto Chamorro

What outcome are you hoping for with this campaign?

I hope that people will see this and realize how important it is to teach our young minds about art and music. How introducing them to it at an early stage is a huge factor in a child’s development. I won’t bore you with numbers, stats, and figures, but there is a ton of data on the benefits this type of education has to our kids growing up.

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©Roberto Chamorro

Tell us about your process while working on this project. Was it produced in-house? What challenges did you face?

Being a passion project that was self-funded, I had to produce this in-house and pull a few favors along the way. The location was tricky. I wanted a school that had character and resembled the elementary schools of my generation. Most schools these days look a bit sterile and too modern with their digital dry erase boards and technology-driven classrooms. Finally, I found the perfect school and after a few negotiations was able to secure it for our production. When it was time to cast the models, I knew that not only would they be styled in the same way as our artists’ iconic looks, but I needed them to have similar features and physically resemble the celebrities I was portraying. This was especially important for our Pharrell character, who was to be our featured hero of the shoot. After location and casting, everything else fell into place. I had an amazing team helping me every step of the way. From my usual rock star assistants and studio manager to my good friend and prop stylist Rachel Barker, who came on board to help source and custom build some of our props.

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©Roberto Chamorro

Will there be a “phase 2” for this project (i.e. plans to expand it beyond these still images)?

While the primary focus was on still photography, I wanted to take advantage of the production and also capture motion. I recruited another friend of mine, Davy Gomez and his team to come on board as my DP. We storyboarded and planned out the motion shots in pre-production so that we could capture video in between the still shots. The concept footage will be used as an intro to a longer, documentary-style film that is currently in pre-production. The doc film will focus on interviews that feature students and teachers who have faced these tough budget cuts and the elimination of creative programs. In stark contrast, we will also see the point of view from the other side, the ones that did have the education in place and the benefits they feel they have received from art and music being in their curriculum.

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©Roberto Chamorro

Where do you think you would be today if you had not been exposed to art and music programs in your youth?

Who knows what my career would be today if I had never been introduced to the arts?  Maybe I would have pursued business or finance as many of my childhood friends had.  Today, I can only assume that I probably would not be as happy doing that. I truly love what I do every day. Being a photographer is my dream job and I sincerely feel lucky to have a career that I very much enjoy. I honestly believe that my early exposure to art and music programs helped plant seeds that led to my creative path.

 

Matt Sartain- Elements

Matt Sartain teamed up with Jesse Silver, a prop stylist/set designer, for his recent project Elements.

Matt is represented by Tidepool Reps. Check out more of Matt’s work through his AtEdge portfolio and at mattsartain.com.

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

©Matt Sartain

Edo Kars’ Latest Personal Project Proves That Size Really Does Matter

Edo Kars’ latest personal project is a gorgeous series titled Size Does Matter. This project started in early 2015 when Edo was considering that, although everyone who works within advertising expects a photographer to deliver to the highest standards, photographers are almost always chosen based on the quality of their images as seen on a computer monitor. This shift in the way we view photography inspired Edo to show that photographs are most impactful when presented as large prints, proving that size really does matter.

Fascinated by Mother Nature’s artistry and the intricate details in these tiny little bugs, Edo decided to photograph them specifically with this project in mind. He photographed the bugs very close up, but instead of using the expected macro lens in a natural setting, he brought the bugs into the studio where he photographed them using the same technical approach he uses when shooting a car, the difference being that the bugs are two hundred and fifty times smaller than a car! The final prints were done in a range of sizes, the largest being roughly 6.5 ft. x 3.5 ft. which obviously showcases these little creatures in amazing detail. These large-scale prints were officially shown to the public for the first time during the LXRY Fair last December in Amsterdam.

We spoke briefly with Edo’s representative Marilyn Cadenbach to hear more about the project.

To see more work by Edo Kars please visit his AtEdge portfolio and his website, edokars.com.

©Edo Kars

©Edo Kars

What inspired Edo to start this personal project?

Because photography is more accessible than it’s ever been, and images are captured and consumed at such an alarming rate, we no longer know how to really look at photographs. Smartphones are ubiquitous, and we use them frequently to communicate via the social media channel of our choosing. Everyone is able to quickly see and share images anytime and anywhere. And we do. Facebook alone has on average 350 million photos uploaded DAILY. This doesn’t mean these are quality images, but the sheer volume is staggering.

Because of this accessibility, we rarely view actual printed photographs any longer. We see images on a screen, no larger than a couple of inches. This has become customary, and as a result, we’ve lost touch with the impact of large, high-quality photographic prints. We no longer ‘look into’ a photograph. We look ‘at it’, and we do it very quickly. When it comes to photography, images have a very different impact when seen as large prints than when seen on a handheld device. Size Does Matter.

©Edo Kars

©Edo Kars

What specific awards and special notice has the project received?

The series received two honorable mentions in the 2015 IPA and was included in Communication Arts 2015, as well as Lürzer’s Intnl Archive’s 200 Best Ad Photographers 2016/2017. In the Netherlands, Edo was nominated for the 2015 Craft Photography Award with the Dutch ADC (ADCN) for this series.

What process did he use to capture the extraordinary detail in these images?

Edo wanted to isolate the bugs from their natural habitat and to photograph them in a more unexpected way. By bringing them into the studio and lighting them the way he would light a car, he was able to make a departure. Technically speaking, he captured the bugs using a Phase One digital back that has 80Mp on a sensor of 53×40 mm, each pixel is 5.2×5.2 micron, and he used the highest quality Schneider lenses. When shooting, he extended the distance between the lens and the digital back to make sure that he could get close enough to capture the intricate detail of the bug. Being this close, his depth of field was only about 1mm, so he did 8 shots of each bug, and then he combined the shots in layers in post production to ensure that the bugs were entirely in focus. Talk about attention to detail!

The final prints are roughly 6.5 ft x 3.5 ft which certainly puts the viewer up close and personal with these little creatures.

©Edo Kars

©Edo Kars

©Edo Kars

©Edo Kars

Where will the images be exhibited?

In addition to being shown at the LXRY Fair in Amsterdam, the images are currently being shown at Okker Art Gallery, also in Amsterdam. They are also being exhibited in advertising agencies throughout Europe, and Edo is doing presentations where he speaks about the concept, the images and the process of making them. He feels it’s important to help people understand and experience the art of photography, and this is one way he’s making that connection.

©Edo Kars

©Edo Kars

©Edo Kars

Tim Tadder Explores Visual Relationship Between Children’s Couture and Fantastic Landscapes

Tim Tadder has a new collaborative personal project he wants you to see.

Couture Children delves into the visual relationship between the tones and textures of children’s couture clothing and fantastic landscapes.

From Tim,

The result is a great set of images, but it also sets the bar for me to dig deeper into this relationship and explore more. I feel there is more to this and it deserves a second look.

I am inspired to revisit this ASAP. So please review this let me know what you think, full credits to follow on our Behance profile, but special thanks to Hugo Ceneviva leading the post production. Share and provide feedback, we appreciate your input.

©Tim Tadder

©Tim Tadder

 

©Tim Tadder

©Tim Tadder

 

©Tim Tadder

©Tim Tadder

You can view the entire series here.

Tim Tadder is represented by Heather Elder.

Morgan Silk: Jack in the Green

Morgan Silk has been involved in creating photographic images since the mid-1980s after graduating from Blackpool College. He began his career as a creative retoucher working alongside photographers for advertising clients, and then began to experiment with his own photography.

Fast forward a few years and Morgan Silk is now a highly successful photographer in his own right. His major commercial clients include Land Rover, BMW, Umbro and Nike and he’s won numerous awards and accolades.

When he’s not busy shooting for his many clients, he takes time to pursue his own projects. His latest personal project, Jack in the Green delves into the enchanting world of British Folklore.

Jack in the Green is a celebration which stems back to 16th century England where people began crafting elaborate garlands of flowers and leaves for the May Day celebration. When the garlands became so elaborate that they covered the entire man, Jack in the Green was created. By the 19th century, however, the custom started to fade into a memory largely thanks to Victorian disapproval but the 1980’s birthed a number of revivals of Jack in the Green which have continued ever since.

Morgan chose to shoot portraits of the participants in this revived tradition occuring in the seaside town of Hastings:

Most English traditions have a certain oddness and mystery about them and Jack in the Green is no exception. With it’s Pagan roots and Green Man references and not to mention the customary mock sacrifice and slaying of the phallic green “Jack”, it promised to be an interesting time. From young Morris Dancers to old Belly Dancers, from big Bogies to little Fairies, from Pre-Raphaelites to SteamPunks, all-comers who’d made the effort were welcomed and provided a fascinating diversity of unique subjects for Morgan to shoot.

He left the day having shot over 100 separate portraits.

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You can view the complete collection on Morgan Silk’s website. For more of his commercial work, please visit his AtEdge portfolio. Morgan Silk is represented by Peter Bailey Productions.