Postcards

Postcards and printed advertisements were the Zeitgeist of the early 20th century, as well as their most popular social media; collected, shared, and seen by the masses, postcards functioned much like email, facebook, and instagram do 100 years later.  Some of the most famous artists of the early 1900s made posters and postcards; who hasn’t heard of the Jane Avril posters by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, or the liquor and food advertisements of Alphonse Mucha and Leonetto Cappiello?

 

 

Postcards and printed advertisements were the Zeitgeist of the early 20th century, as well as their most popular social media; collected, shared, and seen by the masses, postcards functioned much like email, facebook, and instagram do 100 years later.  Some of the most famous artists of the early 1900s made posters and postcards; who hasn’t heard of the Jane Avril posters by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, or the liquor and food advertisements of Alphonse Mucha and Leonetto Cappiello?

 

 

 

A few years ago, Leonard Lauder promised much of his expansive postcard collection to the Museum of Fine Art, Boston.  From now until mid-April, over 400 of the postcards are on display in “The Postcard Age.”  For anyone fortunate enough to be in the New England area, you can’t afford to miss it; according to mfa.org, “this unprecedented exhibition traces how big historical and cultural themes of the modern age—enthralling, exciting, and sometimes disturbing—played out on the postcard’s tiny canvas.”  The exhibition moves from theme to theme, and has focal points such as the role of women, sports, WWI, the emergence of art nouveau –to name a few.

 

 

 

Such a historically rich trove of commercial art must be seen to be wholly appreciated, but we’ll give you a little sampling right here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have you already been to the show, or want to go? Send us a comment!

 

 

 

read more

See full post here: reneerhyner.com/node-feed2013-01-21.