Tara Donne

Parents | Lighten Up The Grill

It’s been really satisfying to work with Parents art director Emily Furlani on their “Supper is Solved” food section over the last several months. As the magazine moves into its full redesign, I’ve been tasked to contribute in evolving the section and we couldn’t be having more fun experimenting! The latest feature included a lightened up array of grilling options with a family-friendly vibe and some very summery light, which I love!

Country Living | Fish Fry

Summer is all about shooting things in season: peaches and tomatoes, lush trees, people with their feet in the cool water of a placid lake. Naturally, it’s always slightly torturous for me to wait an entire year for these editorials to hit the newsstand. I’m excited to finally share an idyllic fish fry story I shot in Alabama last summer for Country Living. It was damn hot and the sprinklers turned on on my gear, but we all got to jump in after we wrapped, immediately erasing any challenges from our minds! Recipes by Dawn Perry, food styling by Marian Cooper Cairns, and prop styling by Heather Chadduck Hillegas.

Garden & Gun | Bermuda

When Garden & Gun suggests a quick hop over to Bermuda to document the local scene for a summer travel story, there is only one option…pack your suitcase, find a cute assistant, and get on the plane!

The weather had plans of its own (all in all there were only 5 hours of sunshine to work with!) but the amazing views, healthy GF breakfasts, and colorful towns made the trip totally worth it. Favorite moments included a taxi-ride around the island that brought me unexpectedly to the hotel where my parents honeymooned, the steady stream of delicious meals courtesy of sous chef Paul Higgins at Marcus’, and the stunning water of Horseshoe Bay.

Pick up the current issue of Garden & Gun for the full story!




Garden & Gun | Bermuda


Garden & Gun | Bermuda


Garden & Gun | Bermuda


Garden & Gun | Bermuda


Garden & Gun | Bermuda


Garden & Gun | Bermuda


Garden & Gun | Bermuda


Garden & Gun | Bermuda

Making Ways Podcast

A few weeks ago I had the pleasure of meeting up with one of my dear friends, Rob Goodman, to record an episode of his new podcast called Making Ways. Rob and I have been buddies since our first day of college at Syracuse University, where we found ourselves living on the same floor and bonding over art and music. On Making Ways, Rob chats with creative professionals about the unexpected paths they took to get to where they are now. Rob and I discuss how I grew up in a food-obsessed family, the random way that I got my first job out of college at Martha Stewart, the truth about travel photography, and how it’s really good to do the things that scare you. Listen to the episode here! Also, please check out an accompanying article that PDN ran here

Making Ways Podcast

Illustration by Rob Goodman

Eating In | Earth Day Veggie Broth

I’m admittedly obsessed with minimizing waste in the kitchen. It’s immensely satisfying to me on both environmental and culinary levels. My favorite two games in the world are: figuring out what to make with the week’s fridge remains and figuring out what to make with random grocery leftovers from shoots. Yes, I compost too. I just can’t see all of that possibly useful food waste and potential energy sitting in a landfill taking way too long to decompose. 

I understand that composting might feel too daunting or may not be an easy thing to do in your area. I mean, I totally want you to reconsider because I promise it’s not hard, but I get it. On this Earth Day 2017, perhaps you might consider an alternate method of veggie scrap reincarnation: save them up and transform them into a healthier broth than you’re buying in the store! It’s so easy, basically free, and you’ll be making more delicious risottos, soups, and sauces than you were before. Win-win-win.

I like to save my veggie scraps from the week in a gallon Ziplock bag in the fridge. Almost anything is fair game here and onions, carrots, and celery are a great base. I have often read that it’s not good to use cruciferous vegetables but I’ve found that a little bit is fine and not overpowering, especially if you have enough sweet things like carrot and sweet potato peels or bits. I love throwing in onion skins and beet peels, but just know that can affect the color. The most important thing is to make sure that the stalks, leaves, and ends that you are using are clean because you don’t want dirt in your broth!

Here’s a typical mix of what I’ll include along with the holy trinity mentioned above: bits and ends of leeks and ginger, fennel pieces and fronds, peels of sweet potato, garlic including the skin, mushroom stems (the best for depth of flavor!), carrot tops, spinach, kale, or chard that’s on its last legs, plus herbs like parsley and thyme, a bay leaf or two, and peppercorns. It’s always good to consider how you’re going to use the broth and whether you want to include things like fennel, garlic, and ginger which have such strong notes. You want to avoid anything moldy or rotten, obviously. If you think it’ll take you longer than a week to collect the scraps or make the stock, pop your storage bag or container in the freezer instead. 

The process is simple: wash off any dirt and roughly chop your veg. (You want about 4 cups of veg and that will yield about 2 quarts of broth.) Throw them in a big stockpot and cover them with water, but not so much that you can’t stir the pot. Add any herbs, bay leaf, or peppercorn. Bring to just under a boil over medium-high heat, then simmer on medium-low for about an hour, stirring occasionally. Strain and store, letting the broth cool completely before putting in the refrigerator or freezer. I don’t usually salt the broth until I know what sort of plans I have for it. Remember to mark the storage containers, especially if you’ve included something of note like ginger! The broth will keep in the fridge for up to a week and in the freezer for three months. You can also experiment with sautéing the onion, carrots, and celery before adding the rest of the veggies and water or by roasting all of the veg first too.

Eating In | Turmeric Tea

Spring is finally here and for a lot of us that means allergies and inflammation. If you’re feeling me, look no further than this take on traditional golden milk by Monica Pierini. Turmeric is known for it’s fantastic anti-inflammatory properties and it’s such a treat paired with coconut milk! Happy sipping.

Food styling by Monica Pierini, props courtesy of Prophaus

Food styling by Monica Pierini, props courtesy of Prophaus

Serves 1

1 cup dairy-free milk of choice (coconut milk is best) 

1-inch piece turmeric, peeled and sliced

black pepper 

agave 

Bring coconut milk to a simmer. Add turmeric and simmer for 10 minutes. Pour through a sieve and serve with a pinch of freshly ground pepper and agave, to taste. 

Make your own variation by adding additional spices such as cardamom, cinnamon or clove.

Eating In | Forbidden Bowl

This is the sort of meal I love because it fits my own shopping habits. Instead of requiring a complicated grocery trip unto itself, I can use pantry staples like grains, eggs, and yogurt that I tend to always have on hand, making it a perfect stress-free, healthful choice. This recipe is the brain-child of my friend Monica Pierini, who is a fabulous food stylist, and an easy go-to meal that uses a few simple ingredients to tremendously delicious effect.  

Food styling by Monica Pierini, props courtesy of Prophaus

Serves 2

1 cup forbidden rice

2 cups broth 

2 eggs

1/4 cup whole milk yogurt

1-inch piece turmeric, peeled and finely grated

salt and pepper

1/2 head radicchio or other chicory, torn into bite size pieces

4 tablespoons mixed chopped herbs such as chives, parsley, and mint

1 lemon, supremed

In a medium pot combine rice and broth and bring to a boil. Simmer on low for 30 minutes. Remove from the heat and keep covered for 10 minutes. Flake with a fork and set aside. In a medium pot bring enough water to cover the eggs to a boil. Add eggs and simmer for 6 minutes. Peel and set aside. In a small bowl combine yogurt, turmeric, salt and pepper to taste. Serve turmeric yogurt topped with rice, radicchio, herbs, lemon and eggs. Serve with additional salt and pepper. 

Eating In | GF Chocolate Chip Oat Cookies with Hazelnuts

Every food person I know is obsessed with Tara O’Brady’s recipe for Basic, Great Chocolate Chip Cookies. Their photogenic nature (roughly chopped chocolate and an adornment of flaky sea salt) is surely what drew me in and inspired me to play with creating a gluten-free version. And not that Tara’s recipe isn’t perfect as it is, but I wanted to go a bit beyond simply replacing the regular AP flour with a gluten-free one because, well, I like stuff in my cookies. So, I rearranged the flour measurements, used the King Arthur gluten-free mix (without gums) along with some oat flour, and added rolled oats and hazelnuts. My gluten-eating neighbors asked for the recipe, which I think is a good sign. Here it is:

Gluten-Free Chocolate Chip Oat Cookies with Hazelnuts

makes about 28 cookies

1 cup unsalted butter, chopped
2  1/2 cups gluten-free AP flour
1  1/2 cups gluten-free oat flour
3/4 cup gluten-free rolled oats
1  1/4 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1  1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
1  1/2 cups light brown sugar, firmly packed
1/2 cup granulated sugar
2 eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
12 ounces, semi or bittersweet chocolate, chopped (or chips)
1/2 cup hazelnuts, roughly chopped
flaky salt, to finish

Preheat the oven to 360°F. Line 2 rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper.

Melt the butter in a heavy bottomed saucepan over the lowest heat possible, stirring occasionally. Make sure the butter does not sizzle or bubble which means it’s losing moisture.

In a bowl, whisk together the flours, oats, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Set aside. Pour the melted butter into a large bowl and whisk in the sugars until smooth. Add the eggs, one at a time, whisking until just combined. Stir in the vanilla. Use a wooden spoon or silicone spatula to stir in the dry ingredients until barely blended. When things are still looking a bit floury, stir in the chocolate and hazelnuts until all of the ingredients are just combined.

Roll the dough into balls, about 3 tablespoons each, and arrange them on the prepared pans, leaving 3 inches between each cookie. (At this point you can refrigerate the dough, loosely covered, overnight.)

To bake, sprinkle each cookie with a bit of sea salt and bake until the tops are cracked and lightly golden, 12-14 minutes, rotating the pan halfway through. Cool on the pan for 2 minutes, the move to a wire rack to cool completely.

The Kitchn | New Orleans

Last month I had the chance to visit New Orleans for my friends at The Kitchn, and while it was not my first encounter with this magical city, I’m never bored with it. NOLA has a special way of making you enjoy going with the flow and creating new experiences. What started off as a trip with goals and plans ended with my flight back home being grounded, extra time in the Crescent City, and a masquerade ball and dinner hosted by Mario Batali for the Link Stryjewski Foundation (an organization that supports local youth empowerment groups). I scrambled to find something to wear, but it was totally worth it as the Bal Masqué featured an amazing array of dishes by some of the best chefs around the country. My favorite dish of the weekend was a boozy, citrusy, Baked Alaska type thing called “Satsuma Business,†born from the minds of Babbo’s Rebecca Deangelis and Nick Morgenstern. In typical over-the-top New Orleans style, The Kitchn’s Managing Editor and I stole a whole one from a nearby table and dug in with spoons after finishing our own slices. And though I may not rock an evening gown with high tops again for the foreseeable future, I’m grateful for another wonderful trip, surprises included.




The Kitchn | New Orleans


The Kitchn | New Orleans


The Kitchn | New Orleans


The Kitchn | New Orleans


The Kitchn | New Orleans


The Kitchn | New Orleans


The Kitchn | New Orleans


The Kitchn | New Orleans

Winter Fruit | Parents Magazine

I love eating in season for different reasons, chief of which are a more delicious flavor and minimizing my carbon footprint. In winter in the Northeast, it’s a bit tough with fruit of course–it’s just not being grown nearby. In order to get my vitamins from real food, I’ll make some concessions and eat things from a bit farther way than I do during the rest of the year. California and the South offer some of the winter fruit in this story I shot for Parents Magazine, which in winter is pretty much the best I can do! Check out the issue for more info on why these fruits are good for you as well as how to shop for and prepare them. Prop styling by Nidia Cueva and food stying by Jerrie Joy.