Al Black and the Highwaymen

On Dave Anderson’s recent trip through the South, he found himself in Florida tracking the most famous of the Highwaymen.  Who are the Highwaymen, you ask? They were, and are, a group of African American artists from the 1960s, who sold their beautiful paintings while on the road;

 

On Dave Anderson’s recent trip through the South, he found himself in Florida tracking the most famous of the Highwaymen.  Who are the Highwaymen, you ask? They were, and are, a group of African American artists from the 1960s, who sold their beautiful paintings while on the road; they originate in Fort Pierce, Florida, and relied on Al Black to sell their works.  Black was a traveling salesman  who took paintings along with him on highways and byways, prepared to sell any of them for $25 apiece.  Al Black learned to paint out of necessity of repairing paintings with him on the road —yet from such pragmatic beginnings blossomed a highly experimental painter, who even found opportunities to paint murals while serving jail-time.

The Highwaymen were inducted into Florida’s Artists Hall of Fame in 2004, and pieces of work that Black originally sold for $25 now go for several thousands of dollars each.  The Highwaymen excel in vibrant Florida landscapes that appear highly impressionistic, as well as passionately and playfully constructed.  Watch this Oxford American and NPR collaboration, entitled “Meet Al Black.”

 

See full post here: reneerhyner.com/node-feed2012-08-30.