A Fishing Story in Fort Kochi, India


first catch of the day

first catch of the day

sunrise at Fort Kochi with the magnificent Chinese fishing nets

sunrise at Fort Kochi with the magnificent Chinese fishing nets

fisherman’s morning prayer

fisherman's morning prayer

Chinese fishing nets

Chinese fishing nets

Chinese fishing nets

Chinese fishing nets

fisherman pull to lift the giant net with ropes + rocks

fisherman pull to lift the giant net with ropes + rocks

fisherman pull in an empty net

fisherman pull in an empty net

chinese fishing nets

chinese fishing nets

fisherman shows off his catch

fisherman shows off his catch

a fresh catch

a fresh catch

selling the catch of the day

selling the catch of the day

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I arrived in Fort Kochi on Easter Sunday. Little did I know that the proverbial curbs would roll up in this sleepy, little, coastal, Southern Indian town due to the Christian holiday. It all seemed rather odd, very quiet and I discovered as I wandered, an unexpected blessing.

With the town being nearly empty, it was oh-so-easy to slow down to a leisurely stroll as we wound our way through tiny streets among Catholic churches, Portuguese architecture,  centuries old Jewish synagogues and signs over doors that said ‘Jew Town’ as a proud reminder of the long Jewish history of this little fishing village.

From the beach, I was humbled by the magnificent structure of the church then again softened when I saw the fisherman at its base raise his hands in prayer at the beginning of the day.  The large, traditional fishing nets are borrowed, ancient technology from China and operate by a cantilever process suspending nets 20 meters or more over the sea.

The modest catch is lifted by the large wood and metal structure with ropes of varying lengths.  Large rocks are used as weights to haul the net up and it hardly seems possible that the contraption could have survived centuries of use.  And yet it has. Watching this quiet, graceful dance of man, ancient machine and nature, I was humbled by the slow pace and the satisfaction of catching just enough as you need.

See full post here: Annabelle Breakey Photography :: Blog2012-08-24.